Q&A with GRACE MONROE

ALFHILD

 

What does Henrik Ibsen's Olaf mean to you?

To me, even though it’s one of Ibsen's early works it could easy be transferred into a modern adaptation and still be relevant now. For me, classical plays that are relatable in the present day allows the audience to buy much more into the characters and circumstances then other works of the time.

 

Olaf is a simple love story very much like Romeo and Juliet or A Midsummer Night's Dream giving the audience romance, tragedy, drama and happy endings. What more could one ask for! Having never read the play until now it’s surprising that this early Ibsen has so little attention. 


What do you think of Alfhild in the play? 

Very often in modern writing, women’s characters tend to sway more towards the one-dimensional stereotypes. It’s not often we as women get to explore a huge range of emotions and contrasting characteristics within one character. 


What I love about her in the start of the play is her lust of life. She’s experiencing everyday things for the first time and you get to go on this journey with her. She’s not affected by the social norms and restraints but in saying that she also is unaware of how to react and handle the hardships in the traditional sense.  


At the end of the day she wants what most people try to get away from, to be a normal women in a normal town. I am thrilled to be playing Alfhild and hope that people warm to her, sympathise and understand where she is coming from towards the end of the play.